Handicrafts & Omani Products :


Shipbuilding
Shipbuilding yards can be found lining the Gulf of Sur, where one can experience first hand, the impressive craft of ship building. Building large ships is no longer practiced; only boats and small ships such as Sanbook are currently being produced.

Several professional shipbuilders now make miniature models of the various old Omani ships that once graced the waters of the Sultanate.

Not far from the yards, a small naval museum has been set up for interested visitors showcasing the history of shipbuilding in the region, marine tools utilised for building, navigation and more, a large selection of pictures highlighting the seafarers and ships of yesteryear.

The Public Authority for Craft Industries has been established to collect, document and sponser traditional handicrafts and inducstries of Oman.

Pottery
In addition to shipbuilding and the leather industry, the clay industry in Oman is considered one of the oldest and most important traditions.

Archaeological discoveries revealed that clay industry was active throughout Oman during the forth millennium B.C. The clay industry was influenced by ancient civilizations like the Sumerian, making use of Iranian techniques.

Further down the historical timeline, the Omani clay industry saw its influence coming from the clays of Samuraa’, Siraf and Yemen, where Islamic industries flourished.

The Public Authority for Craft Industries has been established to collect, document and sponser traditional handicrafts and inducstries of Oman.

Silver Minting
Oman’s silver industry is an ancient trade. Practiced for many centuries throughout the Sultanate, it has developed with time honoured tradition into a highly diverse and tasteful skill.

Centred primarily in Nizwa, this business is widespread and can be found in Muscat, Muttrah, Salalah, Ibri, Bahla, Rustaq and Sur. Throughout the Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries the main source of silver was the Austrian Maria Theresa Rial, which remained in circulation up to and including the year 1970.

The nation emblem of Oman is the Khanjar. With its prominent design, ornate appearance and silver embellishments, the Khanjar is considered one of the most distinctive silver artefacts of all.

The Public Authority for Craft Industries has been established to collect, document and sponser traditional handicrafts and inducstries of Oman.

Spinning & Weaving
Goats are not only considered a vital source of food in Oman, but also an important source of wool, as is the sheep.

Omani producers use this wool to create some daily necessities, for example, tents (Bedouin residence), mats, cover for pack animals, saddlebags, shoes etc. The traditional hand loom is used to make threads.

The Public Authority for Craft Industries has been established to collect, document and sponser traditional handicrafts and inducstries of Oman.

Palm-Frond Weaving
Oman has a wealth of approximately eight million palm trees of varying types. It is noted that a variety of palms produce dates of unparalleled sweetness anywhere in the world.

In general, the longest season in the palm tree calendar is that of Al-Rutab (ripe dates).

The majority of the date harvest is consumed locally with the remainder exported to various countries.

The leaves themselves are stripped from the tree and utilised by skilled craftsmen to manufacture a host of objects, useful in daily life such as ropes, baskets, bird cages, pergolas, mats, fans and fishing cages to name but a handful.

The Public Authority for Craft Industries has been established to collect, document and sponser traditional handicrafts and inducstries of Oman.

Kummah Embroidery
It is not known when the first Kummah was introduced into Oman, nor is it possible to trace the circumstances with which it came to be.

However, what is known is that this sophisticated head dress is unique in that it is woven only by women to be worn only by men.

The Public Authority for Craft Industries has been established to collect, document and sponser traditional handicrafts and inducstries of Oman.

Omani Halwa
The Omani Halwa is a highly regarded symbol of generosity and distinction within the Omani community.

It constitutes from: starch, eggs, sugar, water, saffron, ghee, cardamom, nuts, and rosewater; usually brought from Al-Jabal Al-Akhdar.

The ingredients are mixed in specified proportions and normally cooked in a large pot called Al-Mirjal, for not less than two hours with continuous stirring. The Halwa is served in honour of guests and on special occasions.

The Public Authority for Craft Industries has been established to collect, document and sponser traditional handicrafts and inducstries of Oman.

Shrimp Fishing
Shrimp fishing season in Oman is certainly an exciting and special sight to behold. With roughly one thousand fishing vessels gathering within close proximity of each other, remaining close to shore at all times, the event is more like a celebration than work.

Dolphins are seen playfully jumping between the boats, creating a truly unique and amusing experience, restricted to the season extending from September to March, with October being the peak.

The setting for this spectacle can be seen in several locations, the most prominent of which is a small island surrounded by thick mangrove vegetation in the Wilayat of Muhut. In addition to the aforementioned spot, shrimp fishing is also practiced in the coastal village of Khalloof, not far from Muhut and the Wilayat of Duqm; some 200 Km from Muhut. All fishing is performed along shallow shores at depths ranging from 20 and 50 metres.

The Public Authority for Craft Industries has been established to collect, document and sponser traditional handicrafts and industries of Oman.

Rose Water Distillation
Approximately 150 Km from the capital city of Muscat, one of the Sultanate’s most distinguished tourist destinations, Al Jabal Al Akhdar, ‘The Green Mountain’ can be found.

Between the months of March and May, the heights of the mountain, particularly the villages of Al Shareejah and Seiq, are overflowing with rose pickers.

The rose picking season and the distilling of the resultant waters produced from the rose petals are most productive in April. The densely packed rose shrubs are converged upon by a multitude of people, making it a beautiful and eye catching scene. Roses are picked at two intervals of the day; early morning when the roses bloom and early evening, as the sun begins to set.

Distillation process is a long and arduous task, continuing throughout the day and well into the night. Once this stage is complete, rose water is collected in clay urns and kept covered in a closed dark room for ninety days. Only at this point can the urn be removed and the product bottled and prepared for market.

The Public Authority for Craft Industries has been established to collect, document and sponsor traditional handicrafts and industries of Oman.