Mountains in Oman

 


Mountains constitute a large percentage of the environment of Oman. The flora and fauna living in these mountains vary. The Al Hajar Mountains have kept the interior of Oman isolated for millennia , and the remote villages steeply terraced into the mountainsides seem little changed in that time. In Salalah the mountains have captured the moisture in the ocean air, allowing the liquid gold of frankincense to be grown on their slopes.


Al Jabal Al Akhdar (Green Mountain)
-  This rises to a height of 2,980 metres and is famous for its wide plateau close to the summit. The journey from Muscat to Al Jabal Al Akhdar takes about two hours and can only be undertaken by four-wheel drive. Al Jabal Al Akhdar is known for its Mediterranean climate. Temperatures drop during winter to below zero Celsius, with snow falling at times, and rise in summer to 22 degrees Celsius. Due to its location and unique weather, the Green Mountain produces a variety of fruits, such as apricots, plums, figs, grapes, apples and pears, as well as almonds, walnuts and saffron. The pomegranate that grows here is classified among the finest of its kind in the world.


Jabal Shams (Sun Mountain)
  - This is the highest peak in the Arabian Peninsula, rising to an altitude of 3,004 metres above sea level, and has a number of versants (slopes) and summits. Every time a tourist reaches a versant, he’ll find that it leads him to another, until he reaches the mountain peak. Life on the summit is different from what most people are used to, as the weather is mild in summer and cold in winter. Close to the peak lies a deep chasm called the "An Nakhr Balcony", one of the most beautiful places tourists visit. It is a deep ravine in the heart of the rocks that can be viewed from the top, which directly overlooks the ravine. At the bottom of the ravine rock formations chiselled into different forms by erosion lie at breathtaking depth. Tourist guest houses have been built where the visitor can spend time enjoying the serenity of this scenic mountain.


Samhan Mountain
  is one of the most important mountain ranges in the Governorate of Dhofar, with a maximum height of 2,100 metres. Samhan Mountain includes many plateaus punctuated by narrow and deep gorges, some of which are about 1,000 metres deep. Various plants grow in the plain of Jabal Samhan, such as acacia and gum trees. The narrow mountain passes have little water but there are a number of streams, which are an important source of water for most animals found in the region. Besides the Arabian leopard (considered a rare animal), these mountains are home to a number of other mammals such as the Arabian gazelle, foxes and the Nubian ibex.


Ramlat Tawq
is an area of beautiful sand dunes, extending for tens of kilometres and located between Wilayat Barka and Nakhil in Al Batinah South Governorate, and is one of the sites frequented by tourists in large numbers due to its proximity to the capital Muscat.